How to Make Money with Raspberry Pi: List of Possible Ways!

Bitcoin Newcomers FAQ - Please read!

Welcome to the /Bitcoin Sticky FAQ

You've probably been hearing a lot about Bitcoin recently and are wondering what's the big deal? Most of your questions should be answered by the resources below but if you have additional questions feel free to ask them in the comments.
It all started with the release of the release of Satoshi Nakamoto's whitepaper however that will probably go over the head of most readers so we recommend the following videos for a good starting point for understanding how bitcoin works and a little about its long term potential:
Some other great resources include Lopp.net, the Princeton crypto series and James D'Angelo's Bitcoin 101 Blackboard series.
Some excellent writing on Bitcoin's value proposition and future can be found at the Satoshi Nakamoto Institute.
Some Bitcoin statistics can be found here and here. Developer resources can be found here. Peer-reviewed research papers can be found here.
Potential upcoming protocol improvements and scaling resources here and here.
The number of times Bitcoin was declared dead by the media can be found here (LOL!)

Key properties of Bitcoin

Where can I buy bitcoins?

Bitcoin.org and BuyBitcoinWorldwide.com are helpful sites for beginners. You can buy or sell any amount of bitcoin (even just a few dollars worth) and there are several easy methods to purchase bitcoin with cash, credit card or bank transfer. Some of the more popular resources are below, also check out the bitcoinity exchange resources for a larger list of options for purchases.
Here is a listing of local ATMs. If you would like your paycheck automatically converted to bitcoin use Bitwage.
Note: Bitcoins are valued at whatever market price people are willing to pay for them in balancing act of supply vs demand. Unlike traditional markets, bitcoin markets operate 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Preev is a useful site that that shows how much various denominations of bitcoin are worth in different currencies. Alternatively you can just Google "1 bitcoin in (your local currency)".

Securing your bitcoins

With bitcoin you can "Be your own bank" and personally secure your bitcoins OR you can use third party companies aka "Bitcoin banks" which will hold the bitcoins for you.
Note: For increased security, use Two Factor Authentication (2FA) everywhere it is offered, including email!
2FA requires a second confirmation code to access your account making it much harder for thieves to gain access. Google Authenticator and Authy are the two most popular 2FA services, download links are below. Make sure you create backups of your 2FA codes.
Google Auth Authy OTP Auth
Android Android N/A
iOS iOS iOS

Watch out for scams

As mentioned above, Bitcoin is decentralized, which by definition means there is no official website or Twitter handle or spokesperson or CEO. However, all money attracts thieves. This combination unfortunately results in scammers running official sounding names or pretending to be an authority on YouTube or social media. Many scammers throughout the years have claimed to be the inventor of Bitcoin. Websites like bitcoin(dot)com and the btc subreddit are active scams. Almost all altcoins (shitcoins) are marketed heavily with big promises but are really just designed to separate you from your bitcoin. So be careful: any resource, including all linked in this document, may in the future turn evil. Don't trust, verify. Also as they say in our community "Not your keys, not your coins".

Where can I spend bitcoins?

Check out spendabit or bitcoin directory for millions of merchant options. Also you can spend bitcoin anywhere visa is accepted with bitcoin debit cards such as the CashApp card. Some other useful site are listed below.
Store Product
Gyft Gift cards for hundreds of retailers including Amazon, Target, Walmart, Starbucks, Whole Foods, CVS, Lowes, Home Depot, iTunes, Best Buy, Sears, Kohls, eBay, GameStop, etc.
Spendabit, Overstock and The Bitcoin Directory Retail shopping with millions of results
ShakePay Generate one time use Visa cards in seconds
NewEgg and Dell For all your electronics needs
Bitwa.la, Coinbills, Piixpay, Bitbill.eu, Bylls, Coins.ph, Bitrefill, LivingRoomofSatoshi, Coinsfer, and more Bill payment
Menufy, Takeaway and Thuisbezorgd NL Takeout delivered to your door
Expedia, Cheapair, Destinia, Abitsky, SkyTours, the Travel category on Gyft and 9flats For when you need to get away
Cryptostorm, Mullvad, and PIA VPN services
Namecheap, Porkbun Domain name registration
Stampnik Discounted USPS Priority, Express, First-Class mail postage
Coinmap and AirBitz are helpful to find local businesses accepting bitcoins. A good resource for UK residents is at wheretospendbitcoins.co.uk.
There are also lots of charities which accept bitcoin donations.

Merchant Resources

There are several benefits to accepting bitcoin as a payment option if you are a merchant;
If you are interested in accepting bitcoin as a payment method, there are several options available;

Can I mine bitcoin?

Mining bitcoins can be a fun learning experience, but be aware that you will most likely operate at a loss. Newcomers are often advised to stay away from mining unless they are only interested in it as a hobby similar to folding at home. If you want to learn more about mining you can read more here. Still have mining questions? The crew at /BitcoinMining would be happy to help you out.
If you want to contribute to the bitcoin network by hosting the blockchain and propagating transactions you can run a full node using this setup guide. If you would prefer to keep it simple there are several good options. You can view the global node distribution here.

Earning bitcoins

Just like any other form of money, you can also earn bitcoins by being paid to do a job.
Site Description
WorkingForBitcoins, Bitwage, Cryptogrind, Coinality, Bitgigs, /Jobs4Bitcoins, BitforTip, Rein Project Freelancing
Lolli Earn bitcoin when you shop online!
OpenBazaar, Purse.io, Bitify, /Bitmarket, 21 Market Marketplaces
/GirlsGoneBitcoin NSFW Adult services
A-ads, Coinzilla.io Advertising
You can also earn bitcoins by participating as a market maker on JoinMarket by allowing users to perform CoinJoin transactions with your bitcoins for a small fee (requires you to already have some bitcoins.

Bitcoin-Related Projects

The following is a short list of ongoing projects that might be worth taking a look at if you are interested in current development in the bitcoin space.
Project Description
Lightning Network Second layer scaling
Blockstream, Rootstock and Drivechain Sidechains
Hivemind and Augur Prediction markets
Tierion and Factom Records & Titles on the blockchain
BitMarkets, DropZone, Beaver and Open Bazaar Decentralized markets
JoinMarket and Wasabi Wallet CoinJoin implementation
Coinffeine and Bisq Decentralized bitcoin exchanges
Keybase Identity & Reputation management
Abra Global P2P money transmitter network
Bitcore Open source Bitcoin javascript library

Bitcoin Units

One Bitcoin is quite large (hundreds of £/$/€) so people often deal in smaller units. The most common subunits are listed below:
Unit Symbol Value Info
bitcoin BTC 1 bitcoin one bitcoin is equal to 100 million satoshis
millibitcoin mBTC 1,000 per bitcoin used as default unit in recent Electrum wallet releases
bit bit 1,000,000 per bitcoin colloquial "slang" term for microbitcoin (μBTC)
satoshi sat 100,000,000 per bitcoin smallest unit in bitcoin, named after the inventor
For example, assuming an arbitrary exchange rate of $10000 for one Bitcoin, a $10 meal would equal:
For more information check out the Bitcoin units wiki.
Still have questions? Feel free to ask in the comments below or stick around for our weekly Mentor Monday thread. If you decide to post a question in /Bitcoin, please use the search bar to see if it has been answered before, and remember to follow the community rules outlined on the sidebar to receive a better response. The mods are busy helping manage our community so please do not message them unless you notice problems with the functionality of the subreddit.
Note: This is a community created FAQ. If you notice anything missing from the FAQ or that requires clarification you can edit it here and it will be included in the next revision pending approval.
Welcome to the Bitcoin community and the new decentralized economy!
submitted by BitcoinFan7 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Zhuoer Jiang: Talk about the difference between BTC, BCH and BSV

Zhuoer Jiang: Talk about the difference between BTC, BCH and BSV

https://preview.redd.it/kcdq7qrjnyd51.jpg?width=570&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=af67bd46683fbe3ffa6c081d490d69598dd83bbb
1. When do you contact Bitcoin? What do you think of the blockchain industry?
I came into contact with Bitcoin in October 2013. At that time, I was making game aids, which involved the issue of collecting money from Taiwan and Southeast Asia.
The reason for cultivating the blockchain industry is that blockchain is the only industry that can provide economic freedom. The blockchain is decentralized and has no control center, so no one can eliminate it, so it provides economic freedom. The counter-example is Qvod player. Although Qvod player also has tens of thousands of nodes, it is centralized. As long as the control center is killed, the Qvod player network will die. (QvodPlayer is a Chinese-based video-on-demand playback software, using P2P technology, users can watch online film and television programs through buffering. In mainland China, QvodPlayer has a huge number of users. Due to the use of a dedicated transmission protocol, QvodPlayer is used by some users to download banned videos, such as violent or pornographic videos, and politically sensitive videos. In addition, pirated movies are rampant in QvodPlayer)
I am not a Bitcoinist. As long as other tokens provide economic freedom, I will buy them with real money. My position portfolio is BCH 40% + BTC 30% + ETH 20% + economically free innovative currency 10%, and I think that ETH is likely to exceed BTC in total market value in this bull market.
2. What is the difference between BTC, BCH and BSV?
The easiest thing to see is the difference in block size. BTC blocks have been locked at about 1MB, while BSV advocates infinite blocks. BCH advocates a moderate block size, which cannot exceed the carrying capacity of an ordinary computer. The current value is about 32MB.
Both BTC and BSV have gone to extremes. The BTC development team, Core, pursues extreme decentralization, resulting in too small blocks and high transaction fees. In the last bull market, a transaction fee was as high as hundreds of thousands of yuan, which caused a large number of BTC users to flow out to BCH, ETH and other tokens.
Some people think that BTC can rely entirely on stored-value users instead of using users to survive. This is impossible. If there are no users, there are no stored value users. For example, gold is obviously more suitable for storing value, but almost everyone has bank deposits, except for the elderly, almost no one uses gold to store value. To
People usually use paper money to store value, and naturally they also use paper money to store value. It is impossible to use paper money to store value with gold, and it is impossible to use paper money for small transactions and gold for large transactions. Currency has a scale effect, and it must be a winner takes all.
BSV has gone to the other extreme. The blockchain is enough to store transaction data, but if the blockchain is used as cloud storage, no amount of space is enough. Think about how many resources the world has to store. The result is that the performance requirements are too high, the number of nodes is drastically reduced, and the foundation of the blockchain, which is decentralization, is lost. In the end, it falls into the same fate as the Qvod player. To
Behind the different block sizes are the differences in the spirit of the three. Just like during the Opium War, the difference between Britain and China's Qing Dynasty was not a superficial weapon, but a complete political, economic, and technological gap behind it.
Both BTC and BSV are irrational and religious to a certain extent. BTC advocates a deadlock block size, and BSV advocates a deadlock protocol. The two are very similar.
In terms of rational development and serving users, BCH has won. For example, the issuance of tokens is an important function and rigid demand of the blockchain. Tokens can already be issued on BCH through several protocols such as Wormhole and SLP, while BTC and BSV cannot yet. This is a huge difference in development.
3. Under what circumstances can BCH exceed BTC?
BCH has to wait for users to slowly develop until the number of users and transactions exceed BTC. Although under normal circumstances, the currency has a scale effect, this situation is unlikely to happen, but BTC made a fatal mistake, and locked the block and locked the user.
What if BTC expands like BCH?
First of all, BTC cannot be expanded because the expansion requires a hard fork, regardless of whether it is within the community or the Core, it must adhere to 1MB, insist on extreme decentralization, and BTC must be able to run on the Raspberry Pi. The result is that the expansion advocates in BTC and Core re-hard fork.
Isn't this the plot of the hard fork of BCH from BTC in 2017? So what are these "advocates" doing hard forking again? Just go straight to BCH.
Therefore, BTC must undergo a hard fork to expand, so it cannot be expanded.
So BCH only needs to catch up, which is a fixed goal. I estimate that in this bull market, BCH can exceed the number of users. At that time, BCH had a solid foundation of users and communities. The price increase only increases the price of BCH, the value of BCH is determined by the number of users, and the price fluctuates around the value.
4. Will BCH hard fork happen? What impact will it have on us later?
The BCH community has recently had a lot of discussions on the issue of miner donations, which reflects the decentralization of BCH.
If BCH is controlled by bitmain, why it took a long time for bitmain to implement this problem? Conversely, if CSW wants to modify something on BSV, it can be passed immediately.
5. Do you think BCH is worth long-term ownership?
I often say: "Ask God in the short term, and the number of users in the long term."
The longer the time, the more worth holding BCH. BCH is developing rapidly due to the correct route. I just gave an example. There are already several schemes for issuing tokens on BCH, but neither BTC nor BSV have one. Part of it is because BSV locks the protocol and is not convenient for development. The other part It is because the BSV community has inherited the characteristics of CSW and only speaks big words and does not do practical things.
Therefore, it is definitely worth holding for 1 to 2 years, and the rate of increase is likely to be higher than that of BTC. I predict that the highest point of this round of bull market for BCH will rise from about 3.6% of BTC to 10% to 20% of BTC.
8. Free Q&A
"Will Bitcoin die due to quantum computers or other reasons?"
Certainly not, at best, replace a quantum-resistant algorithm. Looking at it now, quantum computers will not be practical for a long time. And I think quantum computers may not be able to solve the NP problem, that is, the current asymmetric encryption problem, which may not be possible mathematically.
"The impact of the proliferation of contract transactions on currency prices?"
The currency price is ultimately determined by the number of users, not by speculative users. The proliferation of futures trading has happened long ago. From 2016 to 2017, in the presence of a large number of futures trading, BTC rose 100 times.
"Will you be notified when you escape?"
I will definitely not inform. I have already made predictions. I think the bull market may end in the second half of 2021. Or conversely, this bull market may last for two to three years, and two years are more likely.
Why not notify? Most of my clients are miners, and the currency price directly affects the income of the miners. If the currency price drops due to my notification, the interests of my clients will be damaged.
"Recommended regular investment in 2019, what strategy is recommended in 2020?"
This year's bull market has begun, and it must be a full position investment. The cost of regular investment to buy coins later is very high.
"Is it better to speculate or to mine now?"
Most people can't insist on holding the token from start to finish. Most people are in the middle of the bull market, or even sell it at the beginning, and then miss the entire bull market.
Only miners, no matter what level of miners, will hold the token from beginning to end. During the entire bull market, miners are very profitable. Miners will certainly not sell the goose that lays golden eggs like mining machines in the bull market, so miners tend to make more. The earliest miners are basically still active in the market, and their wealth is free, while the earliest holders of coins are almost gone.
submitted by paulcheung1990 to Bitcoincash [link] [comments]

I earned about 4000% more btc with my android tablet than with a $250 ASIC mini rig setup using GekkoScience Newpac USB miners!

Requirements:
1.) Android Device with access to Google Play Store. *I haven't tried yet but you may be able to use tis on Android TV devces as well by sideloading. If anyone has success before I try, let me know! -Note, I did this with a Samsung Galaxy Tab S6 so its a newer more powerful device. If your android is older, your profts will most likely be less than what I earned but to give a projected range I also tested on my Raspberry Pi 4 running a custom LineageOS rom that doesn't allow the OS to make full use of the Pi's specs and I still got 500 h/s on that with Cloud boost, so about 60% of what my Tab 6 with MUCH Higher Specs does.
**Hey guys. Before I get started i just wanted to be clear about one thing. Yes I have seen those scammy posts sharing "miracle" boosts and fixes. I have a hard time believing stuff online anymore. But this is honestly real. Ill attach photos and explain the whole story and process below. Thanks for taking the time to read and feel free to share any thoughts, concerns, tips, etc*
So last week I finally got started with my first mini rig type mining build. I started getting into crypto about a year ago and it has taken me a long time to even grasp half of the projects out there but its been fun thus far! Anyways my rig was 2 GekkoScience Newpac USB miners, a Moonlander USB miner to pair with an FPGA i already had mining, a 10 port 60W 3.0 USB hub and 2 usb fans. The Newpacs actually are hashing at a combined 280 g/s which is actually better than their reported max hash rate when overclocked. Pleasant surpise and they are simple!! I just wanted to get a moonlander because my fpga already mines on Odocrypt for DGB and I just wanted to experience Scrypt mining and help build the DGB project. The Newpacs are mining BTC though.
After I got everything up and running i checked my payout daily average after 1 week. I averaged .01 a day TOTAL between all three miners with them all perforing ABOVE SPEC!!! I had done research so i knew I wouldnt earn much. More than anything i just wanted to learn. But still. I was kinda surprised in a negative way. Yesterday I actually earned less than .01 Frustrated I went back to scouring the web for new ideas. About a year ago, when II was starting, I saw an app on my iphone called CryptoBrowser that claimed to mine btc on your phone without actually using phone resources using a method of cloud mining. I tried it for a week and quit because I earned like .03 after a ton of use and seemed scammy. Plus my iphone actually would get very hot when doing this so I quit using it as it seemed like a possible scam with all the cryptonight browser mining hacks and malware out there.
Anyways I was on my Galaxy Tab S6 and saw that CryptoBrowser released a "PRO" edition for 3.99 on Google Play. I bought it for Sh*ts and giggles and booted it up. It came with what they called "Cloud Boost" Essentially this is a button you press and it multiplys the estimated hashrate that it gives you device by the number shown on the boost button. (With the purchase of PRO you get one free x10 boost. You can purchase additional boosts to use with other android devices but those are actually pretty pricy. Another x10 boost was like $25 if i remember correctly).
I played with it for about an hour to see if it actually worked like it said it would this time. To my surprise, as i was browsing, my device didnt increase in temperature AT ALL!!!!! I checked my tast manager to confirm and it was indeed true, my memory and usage barely went up. it was giving me an estimated range of 80-105 on the hashrate. Once i pushed the x10 boost button, that went to 800-1150 h/s. I switched my screen to not go to sleep, plugged it to the charge and let it run on the browser page, hashing. When you push the boost button, it runs for 3 hours at the boosted speeds. After that it goes back to normal but if you press the button again, it boosts everything again. There is no limit to how many times you use it. After checking what I earned after 24 hours, I HAD MADE .40 in BTC!!!!! I JUST EARNED OVER 4000% MORE THAN MY $280 MINING RIG EARNED ME!!!! I was blown away. Maybe this was a fluke? I did it again next day. Every 3 hours or so I would push the button again but thats all. Sure enough, .35 that day. Also, it realy BTC. I requested a payout and although it took like 12 hours for them to send me an email stating they had just sent it, I actually did recieve the state amount of BTC within 24 hours in my personal wallet. The fees to send are SUPER LOW!. Like .01
Below I will list the steps I took, along with an explanation of thier "Mining" process on Androids. Reminder, this ONLY WORKS ON ANDROIDS. Also DO NOT use cryptobrowser on a physcal laptop or desktop. I ran it on an old laptop for three days last year and it fried it. It does actually use your hardware on those platforms to mine and it is not efficnet at all as I suspect they prob steal over half of your power for themselves using the REAL RandomX protocol via browser mining which is EXTREMELY INEFFICIENT DONT TRY IT!!
-----How To Do This Yourself:
Cryptotab Browser states the program works on Android devices by estimating what it thinks the hashrate would be for your device specs and siimulates what you would mine in a remote server however you still earn that estimated coin amount. It is not a SHA-256 process or coin that they say is mining, rather it is XMR and they swap that and pay it out to you in BTC Bitcoin. However I know damn well my Tab S6 doesnt hash 80-105 h/s on RandomX because I have done it with a moodified XMRig module i ported to Android. I got 5 h/s a sec if I was getting any hashes at all. But thats besides the point as I still was making money.
Now, when you press that cloud boost button it immediately boosts that hash rate it estimates by the number on the cloud boost. As stated above, you can purchase more boosts and gift them or use them on extra android devices that you may have. Again, they are pricey so I'm not doing that plus it would just mean that I have another device that I have to leave on and open. The boosts come in x2, x4, x6, x8 and x10 variants. Again, they have unlimited uses.
Here is the link to grab yourself CryptoBrowser Pro from CryptoTab. This IS A REFERRAL LINK! This is where I benefit from doing tis tutorial. Like i said, I want to be transparent as this is not a scam but I'm also not doing this out of the love of my heart. Their referral system works in that people that use the donwload the app using your link are your stage 1 referrals. Anytime they are mining, you earn a 15% bonus. So say they mine $.30 one day. You would get paid out an additional $.045 in your own balance (it does not come out of the referred user balance fyi so no worries). Then lets say that referred miner also gets their own referrals. I would get a 10% bonus on whatever THOSE people mine. This goes on and on for like 8 tiers. Each tier the bonus percntage essential halves. So again, I stand to benefit from this but it also is stupid to not make this visible as its WAY CHEAPER, EASIER AND MORE PROFITABLE TO GET BTC USING THIS METHOD THAN IT IS USING ASICS!! THIS EARNS ALMOST AS MUCH BTC AS AN ANTMINER S7 DOES RUNNING 24/7 ONLY WITHOUT THE HUGE ELLECTRICTY BILL AND COSTS!!!!)
Thats it. Again, if you have concerns, let me know or if you have suggestions, other tips, etc... mention those as well!!!
https://cryptotabbrowser.com/8557319
Links to Picture Proof http://imgur.com/gallery/P13bEsB
submitted by Afraid_Balance to earnbitcoin [link] [comments]

Why Runelite's GPU renderer is one of the most important improvements to OSRS ever.

In a world of "gameplay versus graphics", a GPU renderer improves both

Not only does this new GPU renderer improve game responsiveness and framerate by a huge amount, but it's going to be so radically more efficient that it can afford to have longer draw distances. Not just this, but these distant map tiles will be clickable! Very exciting - every single task, skill, and activity will be smoother and more enjoyable.
Disclaimer: This language and information has been simplified for average gamers. Go away, sweaty "AKTHUALLY" brainlets.

OSRS currently uses a CPU renderer straight out of 2003

It's really REALLY bad! At least, by modern standards. It could not be more opposite to what modern computers pursue. It's not Jagex's fault, it's just old... Very VERY old! It's a huge undertaking, and Jagex has been too busy knocking mobile absolutely out of the park, and I'd do the same if I were them - so don't think this is some kind of rag on Jagex. Anyways, some may be surprised that this renderer is still managing to hurt computers today. How can software first written in 2003-2004 (FOR COMPUTERS OF THAT ERA) be laggy and stuttery on computers today? The answer is simple: resizable mode, and individual CPU core speed.
Resizable mode takes a game window that used to be 765x503 (the majority of which used to be a fixed GUI canvas, but not with the new mode!) and renders it at resolutions as high as 3840x2160, maybe even higher. Do you know how many pixels that is? Over 8 million. Do you know how many pixels the original renderer was designed to expect? Just under 390,000. That's over 21x the work being thrown at modern CPUs. Cores aren't anywhere near 21x faster than they were at the close of the single-core era, which is why players with 4k monitors need to see therapists after long play sessions.
Surely CPUs have gotten faster since the mid 2000s! They have, but not quite in the way that a single-threaded(single core) CPU renderer would expect... CPU manufacturers have been focusing on power draw, temperatures, core count, and special architectural improvements like GPU integration and controller integration. Comparatively, improving individual core speed hasn't been as much of a focus as it had been prior to the multi-core era -and no, I'm not talking about the useless gigahertz(TM) meme measurement, I'm talking about actual overall work done by the core. As a result, the CPUs we have today have developed down a much different path than what this CPU renderer would benefit from. Not nearly the amount that resizable mode demands. Especially considering these CPU cores were designed to assume that things didn't pile all their work onto just one core.
We're throwing over 21x the work at CPUs that, in most cases, have only been getting 5-15% faster per-core performance every year.

What is a "frame"?

Think of a frame as a painting. Your GPU renderer (or CPU cough cough) is responsible for using your GPU to paint an empty canvas, and turn it into a beautiful and complete picture. First, it draws the skybox(if there is one, it's gonna just fill with black in the case of OSRS). Then, it draws all the visible geometry from back to front, with all the lighting and effects. Then, it draws the GUI elements over the top. It does everything, one pixel at a time. Its job is to draw these paintings as quickly as possible (ideally, so you perceive movement) and present them to your monitor, one at a time, forever... until you close the game. Think of a GPU renderer as a talented artist with hundreds of arms (GPU cores).
If your GPU is able to paint this picture in 16.6 milliseconds (frame time measurements are always in milliseconds), then you'll have a frame rate of 60 frames per second, as 1000 ms / 16.6 is 60. Sometimes your renderer struggles, though. Sometimes it can only complete a frame in 100 milliseconds (10FPS). You can't wave a magic want when this happens. If you want a higher framerate, you need to either update your hardware, or change your software. By change software, I mean either make it more efficient at the work it's told to do, or give it less work. RuneLite has done the former. An example of the latter would be lowering resolution, turning graphical details down, turning off filtering, etc. Games usually call this set of controls the "Graphics settings". Luckily, OSRS is so lightweight it will likely never need a graphics settings menu.
(Think of a CPU renderer as a painter with no artistic ability and, in the case of quad core, four arms...but he's only allowed to paint with one, while the other 3 sit idle. Also, he has to constantly stop painting to return to his normal duties! No fun! The CPU is better off at its own desk, letting the GPU handle the painting.)

A GPU renderer improves frame rates

Not that this matters currently, as the game is capped at 50FPS anyways... but it's still going to be huge for low-end systems or high-end systems with high res monitors. There's also the future, though... Once a GPU renderer is out, it could be possible that they could someday uncap the framerate (which, according to mod atlas, is only the character's camera as all animations are 2FPS anyways).
I expect that an update like this will make fixed mode a solid 50FPS on literally everything capable of executing the game. Fixed mode was already easy to run on everything except for old netbooks and Windows Vista desktops, so this really wouldn't be a surprise.

A GPU renderer improves frame times

Frame times are just as important as frame rates. Your frame rate is how many frames are drawn over the course of a second. But, as described previously, each "painting" is done individually. Sometimes the painter takes longer to do something! What if there's a glowing projectile flying past the camera, or something else momentary that's intensive? The painter has to take the time to paint that, resulting in a handful of frames over the course of that second taking much more time than the others. When your frame rate is high and frame times are consistent, this is perceived as incredibly smooth motion.
Ideally, all of our frames are completed in the same amount of time, but this isn't the case. Sometimes "distractions" will come up, and cause the painter to devote an extra 10-20ms to it before returning to the rest of the painting. In bad scenarios, this actually becomes visible, and is referred to as micro stutter. Having a dedicated GPU renderer doing the work ensures this is very uncommon. A GPU has hundreds or thousands of cores. If some get distracted, others reach out and pick up the workload. Everything is smooth, distributed, and uninterrupted.
You may recall Mod Atlas talking about frame times when he posted about his GPU renderer last year: https://twitter.com/JagexAtlas/status/868131325114552321
Notice the part where he says it takes 25+ms on the CPU, but only takes 4-5ms on the GPU! That's 200-250 frames per second, if the framerate were uncapped! Also, side note: Just because a frame is completed in 1ms doesn't always mean your framerate will be 1000FPS. If your framerate is capped, then the painter will sit and wait after completing and presenting a frame until it's time to start painting again. This is why capping your framerate can be good for power usage, as demonstrated on mobile! Your GPU can't suck up your battery if it's asleep 90% of the time!

A GPU renderer is more efficient

Instead of piling all computational workloads and graphical workloads onto one single CPU core (rest in peace 8+ core users), a GPU renderer takes graphical work off the CPU and does it itself. I'd estimate the majority of all the work was graphical, so this will make a pretty noticeable difference in performance, especially on older systems. Before, having OSRS open while using other software would have a noticeable performance impact on everything. Especially on older computers. Not anymore! CPUs will run cooler, software will run better, and your computer may even use less power overall, since GPUs are much better at efficient graphical work than CPUs are!

All computers are already equipped to run this very VERY well

Most of the computers we have today are designed with two things: a good GPU, and an okay CPU. This isn't 2003 anymore. GPUs have made their way into everything, and they're prioritized over CPUs. They're not used just for games anymore, entire operating systems rely on them not just for animations and graphical effects, but entire computing tasks. GPUs are responsible for everything from facial recognition to Bitcoin mining these days. Not having a good one in your computer will leave you with a pretty frustrating experience - which is why every manufacturer makes sure you have one. Now, thanks to RuneLite, these will no longer be sitting idle while your poor CPU burns itself alive.

This new GPU renderer will make OSRS run much better on low end systems

Low end systems are notorious for having garbage like Intel Atom or Celeron in them. Their GPU is alright, but the CPU is absolutely terrible. Using the GPU will give them a boost from 5-15FPS in fixed mode, to around 50. At least, assuming they were made after the GPGPU revolution around 2010.

This new GPU renderer will make OSRS run much better on high end systems

High end systems tend to have huge GPUs and huge monitors. Right now, your GPU is asleep while your 4k monitor brings the current CPU renderer to its knees, on the verge of committing sudoku. Letting your GPU take on all that work will make your big and beautiful monitor handle OSRS without lag or stutter.

This new GPU renderer will open the possibility of plugins that build on top of it

One that comes to mind is a 2x/3x/4x GUI scaler. Scaling things in a graphics API is much easier than scaling it in some convoluded custom CPU renderer that was first designed to run in Internet Explorer 5.

It's easier to customize graphical variables in a GPU renderer than it is a glitchy old CPU renderer

Want night time? Change the light intensity. Want cel-shaded comic book appearance for some stupid reason? It's easy. Want to hit 60FPS on a Raspberry Pi? Change your render distance to 2 tiles. Now that the graphical work has been offloaded to a graphics API that's been literally designed to easily modify these things, the sky is the limit. See my past posts on this topic:
Big round of applause for the RuneLite team, and Jagex for allowing them to continue development. Without RuneLite, OSRS would be half the game it is today. Here's to their continued success, with or without Jagex integrating their code into the main game!
submitted by Tizaki to 2007scape [link] [comments]

To build a processing power beast.

Problem: I am running python codes for a few million iterations and my computer can't handle the workload. It ends up crashing and and my CPU and Memory usage are through the roof. (Specs: i5-7200U CPU 2.50 GHz 2.70 GHz, 8G RAM)
Solutions I am thinking: 1) Build a cluster computer from Raspberry Pis but I dont know how to calculate how many Pis (nodes) I need and if this is the best solution. 2) Build a custom computer but I am not sure what specs I need. I am aware that people in bitcoin mining use crazy FLOP rates and I thought I can use a similar product to run my programming project however, I am confused because some use CPU/GPU methods and others use strong graphic cards.
I will only use the new computer system to run my programming codes i.e. no requirements for gaming, movies etc.
I welcome any ideas you might have and would love some help.
submitted by Dr-Maverick to buildapc [link] [comments]

Fatum, vol. 1 [Chapters 6 - 8]

Chapter 0, Chapter 1, Chapters 2,3, Chapter 4 - 5.4
Chapter 6
One of the main reasons suicide is so upsetting for people is because of finances. Dying is really quite expensive from burials to funerals, to receptions; then there are the accessories that come with death: having your corpse beautified, the nice wooden bed they make to lower your body into the ground, and the cute stone head that has your date of birth, date of death, and name on it. And someone has to get paid decently for these things, as dealing with dead bodies can be troublesome for a lot of people. So these expenses add up, and when you kill yourself you tack on a slew of unexpected debts that someone will have to pay for, it just won’t be you. He chose to treat his death a little differently.
At her workstation, Bell has a distinct coldness in her voice. She swivels around in her chair absent-mindedly, half- heartedly hoping that somehow an Earthly force would relieve her of these arbitrary responsibilities. She begins to space out, as So Many Details by Toro Y Moi blasts off of her Alexa. Revisiting her past life before meeting Him, she remembers always being curious about exploring the world and getting to learn more about how the human mind worked in a collective form. Their first meeting was one where she found herself unable to reign in her curiosity. Even during His prepubescent years, He was clearly the master of His own universe, figuratively, and she picked up on this immediately. They spent the entire night, until their bedtimes at least, getting to know one another. Finding and appreciating both similarities and differences right off the bat probably had a lot to do with the relationship they shared.
But Bell’s existence was also necessary. Although she is blissfully unaware, her companionship with Him is what sparked His deep dive into answers for reasons of existence. She holds herself morally and emotionally liable for His suicide, consistently flashing back to the last words she said to him while he was alive:
““You never loved me, if you do this, you could have never loved me.””
Thinking aloud, startled by the sound of emotion in her own voice,
“So stupid. I’m so stupid. He tells me this is His last day on Earth and I immediately tried to emotionally blackmail him. He really prepared all of us for His departure, but I was never ready to let Him go. I still am not ready, but I know He loved me and I loved Him so I will follow His final instructions. Alexa, activate Protocol Stardust.”
“Searching... Protocol Stardust located. My condolences, Bell.”
“Thanks Alexa but He recommended I turn down condolences. He never wanted people to be sad over His death...”
“Protocol Stardust... 10% Loaded.”
“I just really can’t believe it’s actually happening. I would make a bad habit of indulging with Him in His laughter when we talked about it.”
“Protocol Stardust... 30% Loaded.”
“I mean, who thinks like that? Who even jokes like that? To have your body cremated is one thing, but then to have your ashes spread out into space?”
“Protocol Stardust... 50% Loaded.”
“And then the Bastard went and accommodated Himself. Every time someone would mention the implausibility of His plan He was so calmly confident He would be able to achieve it before His last day.”
“Protocol Stardust... 70% Loaded.”
“Of course He succeeded. All of our fates were sealed when He talked his mom into getting him his first Raspberry Pi. He cashed out in cryptocurrency and had been living on His own time ever since, like some character out of a movie.”
“Protocol Stardust... 99% Loaded.”
“I miss you so much.”
“Protocol Stardust Ready to Execute. Please Provide Final Voice Confirmation.”
The glass finish on her iPhone X felt impossibly smooth in her palm. She chuckled to herself slightly, thinking back to when the iPhone X was first announced and how He had lost His cool that Apple stole the aesthetic from his niche YouTube channel to market the new phone. She knew no one would believe Him, but she genuinely did. She was right to, because maybe they did, but now it seemed like an even greater injustice against His reality that she didn’t fight harder. It wouldn’t have been what He wanted anyway. She positions her phone's camera to catch enough of her facial profile to utilize Face ID. Gently tapping the screen with her thumb, as if to nudge the device awake, the screen glows bright yellow with the custom parallax wallpaper He had designed for her. The text was placed perfect center, reading out ‘“DEATH IS ARTIFICIAL”, with a 1 px fill line striking through the circle of letters, highlighting a hidden message: ‘”DEATH IS ART’”.
Chapter 7
“I can’t believe this shit.”
“Honey, relax. You know He’ll make you whole.”
“Please don’t refer to Him and holes in the same sentence.”
“You're being immature. I know it’s still touchy.”
“I really didn’t think it would bother me as much as it does. I love Him but He takes it too far.”
Blood recirculating into his wrists, Ohsa rubs them gently with his index and middle fingers to soothe himself, because of both the grueling discomfort he had just endured and because of his own doubts if his Friend would be okay.
“Thank goodness you reminded me we were out of pesto sauce. Who knows what would’ve happened if He saw me.”
“What’s that supposed to mean?”
“It means he could’ve tied both of us up and left us here.”
“Oh.”
“This is the last time I go through this: I was down with the orgy but as soon as He got close to me my senses were completely overwhelmed. His words felt like silk flowing into my ears, and the way He smelled – my God His smell,”
“...You said you had felt like you had become a different person.”
Catching herself she resumes, “Yes but no. Now that I think about it, it wasn’t that I was a different person. I was still me, completely me, rolling me, but He was just purely irresistible in that moment. Whoever slept with Him, though, was not the woman that loves you.”
“How do I know you’re not lying?”
“Because I’m trying to communicate with you about it, as opposed to shifting blame. Listen honey, He fucked the shit out of me in the middle of an orgy of people. I can’t stand here and pretend like it didn’t happen or I didn’t enjoy it or I had been so drugged up I didn’t know what I was doing. But when it happened it did, and I was there.”
“What the fuck. I can’t think about this right now. What the hell happened out there? I felt two separate explosions while I was tied up.”
“He destroyed the elevator shaft and the entire left side of the hallway, including part of the door to the stairway. My Twitter Moments feed is saying at least 4 SWAT officers are reported to be in critical condition.”
“What is He thinking?! How is killing cops supposed to help His cool down??”
“Don’t you think He’s been acting a little too wild lately?”
“I’ve seen Him comeback from worse, honestly.”
“Worse than a killing spree?”
“No, I meant drug-wise.”
“Was He high when you saw him?”
“He was definitely on the comedown. I don’t think He was actively stoned but he wasn’t entirely sober, either.”
“Well, regardless he was clear-headed enough to stay ahead of the cops.”
“Cops are fucking idiots.”
Chapter 8
We never know what the future is until we get there. We like to imagine it as augmented reality everywhere, digital on top of reality, seamlessly intertwined together, persisting without being invasive. The truth is, the future is now. All time, past, present, and future, all exist tangentially and concurrently to each other. The 2008 American Recession hit Bell’s parents where it mattered the most: Their bank accounts. It hit at the least opportune time, right as they were preparing to make a class transition from poverty-level to lower middle class. Not only was their savings obliterated, but their morale too. Maybe this spiritual blow was exactly what she needed, maybe it was another unnecessary inconvenience that came with simply trying to exist as a human, but earlier that year she had her first meeting with Him.
Even as children, Him and Bell always had a special connection. Everyone around them could see as clear as day, that these two were in love, even before they knew it for themselves. Almost a year ago to the day, He had made a discovery. Bitcoin was going to crash, and it was going to crash hard. It was clearly being inflated by whales who were egging on spectators but He correctly assumed that the dramatic rise had gotten way too out of hand for anyone to control. Come end of November under the guise of Christmas spirit he traded all of his leftover Team Fortress 2 hats, convincing other players to complete trades in crypto, tricking those who were ignorant to the true value of BTC. He had already amassed a sizeable enough wallet during His early mining days but that extra week of trading is what took him from safety to comfort.
In literally the exact moment the BTC exchange rate was estimated at $20,500 for one coin, he cashed in his entire wallet of 14,634.14163414 Bitcoin, becoming a multi-millionaire overnight, having earned a net worth just shy of $300 Million USD. He excitedly made his first phone call of the night reaching out to Bell.
“Hey Siri, call Bell.”
“Calling Bell – Mobile”
“Hey, what’s up?”
“Not too much. What’s up with you?”
“Oh nothing, just getting ready for bed. I have work early in the afternoon tomorrow but I want to try to get to the gym in the morning. The only way I won’t be exhausted is if I go to sleep now.”
“Yeah, that's cool. Hypothetically, yeah, if your time wasn’t filled up with working a menial job, what would you do?”
“Honestly I’d love to finish getting my Graduate’s degree, maybe go back to China. I loved my time in Undergrad but it was so tough that I really needed a break. It’s just been so jarring to me how difficult it’s been to get back into academia now that I’m in the real world, you know?”
“OK.”
“What’s up with you? Got some exciting plans for the night? You always have crazy shenanigans under your belt.”
“I swear it just happens to me by accident, but yeah. I’m planning on blowing someone’s mind tonight.”
“Ooh lucky them! What’re you gonna do? A surprise visit? Or buy them a gift? Or is it a secret?”
“It won’t be a secret much longer, I just wanted you to know first.”
“Know what first?”
“I’m filthy rich Bell.”
“What?”
“I’m sitting on a few hundred million dollars.”
“WHAT?”
“What country are you from?”
“What?”
Getting comfortable with his Samuel L. Jackson impersonation, he raises his tone: “’What’ ain’t no country I ever heard of! They speak English in ‘What’?!”
Familiar with the reference but still reeling from the news, Bell plays right into his prank.
“...What?”
“English motherfucker! Do you speak it?!”
“Yes!”
“Then you know what I’m saying?”
“Yes!”
Getting as far as he needed to with the joke, he lets out a boisterous hearty laugh and continues the conversation, back to his usual austere speaking voice.
“Relax, love. Quit your job. Enroll in any school you want. Find a new apartment. Order a mani-pedi to a five star hotel, and then stand up your appointment to go to the casino. Your old life is over.”
Thumb to screen, end call. Before the Phone app can finish spelling out “call ended”, he quickly double taps the home button, finding his Messages app open right behind Notes and Voice Memos. A single text to Bell goes out; to let her know that this is the difference, this is what separates the wheat from the chaff, to let her know that she is now wheat and no longer chaff:
“Painted ultrapure white walls triple coated, a high ceiling, in-wall light fixtures, foliage incorporated into the architecture, soft-close furnishings, and lastly location, location, location.”
Bell takes a moment to read the text. Her mind still, but her heart beating faster, the news truly settling in for the first time. She begins to sob uncontrollably.
submitted by viliscane to libraryofshadows [link] [comments]

/r/Bitcoin FAQ - Newcomers please read

Welcome to the /Bitcoin Sticky FAQ

You've probably been hearing a lot about Bitcoin recently and are wondering what's the big deal? Most of your questions should be answered by the resources below but if you have additional questions feel free to ask them in the comments.
Some great introductions for new users are My first bitcoin, Bitcoin explained and ELI5 Bitcoin. Also, the following videos are a good starting point for understanding how bitcoin works and a little about its long term potential:
Also have to give mention to Lopp.net, the Princeton crypto series and James D'Angelo's Bitcoin 101 Blackboard series. Some excellent writing on Bitcoin's value proposition and future can be found at the Satoshi Nakamoto Institute. Bitcoin statistics can be found here, here and here. Developer resources can be found here, here and here. Peer-reviewed research papers can be found here. Potential upcoming protocol improvements here. Scaling resources here. The number of times Bitcoin was declared dead by the media can be found here (LOL!), and of course Satoshi Nakamoto's whitepaper that started it all! :)
Key properties of bitcoin

Where can I buy bitcoins?

Bitcoin.org, BuyBitcoinWorldwide.com and Howtobuybitcoin.io are helpful sites for beginners. You can buy or sell any amount of bitcoin and there are several easy methods to purchase bitcoin with cash, credit card or bank transfer. Some of the more popular resources are below, also, check out the bitcoinity exchange resources for a larger list of options for purchases.
Bank Transfer Credit / Debit card Cash
Gemini Bitstamp LocalBitcoins
Bitstamp Bitit Mycelium LocalTrader
BitFinex Cex.io LibertyX
Cex.io CoinMama WallofCoins
Xapo Spectrocoin BitcoinOTC
Kraken Luno BitQuick
itBit
HitBTC
Bitit
Bisq (decentralized)
Luno
Spectrocoin
Here is a listing of local ATMs. If you would like your paycheck automatically converted to bitcoin use Bitwage.
Note: Bitcoins are valued at whatever market price people are willing to pay for them in balancing act of supply vs demand. Unlike traditional markets, bitcoin markets operate 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Preev is a useful site that that shows how much various denominations of bitcoin are worth in different currencies. Alternatively you can just Google "1 bitcoin in (your local currency)".

Securing your bitcoins

With bitcoin you can "Be your own bank" and personally secure your bitcoins OR you can use third party companies aka "Bitcoin banks" which will hold the bitcoins for you.
Android iOs Desktop
Samouari BreadWallet Electrum
Another interesting use case for physical storage/transfer is the Opendime. Opendime is a small USB stick that allows you to spend Bitcoin by physically passing it along so it's anonymous and tangible like cash.
Note: For increased security, use Two Factor Authentication (2FA) everywhere it is offered, including email!
2FA requires a second confirmation code to access your account, usually from a text message or app, making it much harder for thieves to gain access. Google Authenticator and Authy are the two most popular 2FA services, download links are below. Make sure you create backups of your 2FA codes.
Google Auth Authy
Android Android
iOS iOS

Where can I spend bitcoins?

Check out spendabit or bitcoin directory for some good options, some of the more commons ones are listed below.
Store Product
Gyft Gift cards for hundreds of retailers including Amazon, Target, Walmart, Starbucks, Whole Foods, CVS, Lowes, Home Depot, iTunes, Best Buy, Sears, Kohls, eBay, GameStop, etc.
Steam, HumbleBundle, Games Planet, itch.io, g2g and kinguin For when you need to get your game on
Microsoft Xbox games, phone apps and software
Spendabit, Overstock, The Bitcoin Directory and BazaarBay Retail shopping with millions of results
ShakePay Generate one time use Visa cards in seconds
NewEgg and Dell For all your electronics needs
Bitwa.la, Coinbills, Piixpay, Bitbill.eu, Bylls, Coins.ph, Bitrefill, LivingRoomofSatoshi, Hyphen.to, Coinsfer, More #1, #2 Bill payment
Menufy, Takeaway, Thuisbezorgd NL, Pizza For Coins Takeout delivered to your door!
Expedia, Cheapair, Lot, Destinia, BTCTrip, Abitsky, SkyTours, Fluege the Travel category on Gyft and 9flats For when you need to get away
BitHost VPS service
Cryptostorm, Mullvad, and PIA VPN services
Namecheap, Porkbun For new domain name registration
Stampnik Discounted USPS Priority, Express, First-Class mail postage
Reddit Gold Premium membership which can be gifted to others
Coinmap and AirBitz are helpful to find local businesses accepting bitcoins. A good resource for UK residents is at wheretospendbitcoins.co.uk.
There are also lots of charities which accept bitcoin donations, such as Wikipedia, United Way, ACLU and the EFF. You can find a longer list here.

Merchant Resources

There are several benefits to accepting bitcoin as a payment option if you are a merchant;
If you are interested in accepting bitcoin as a payment method, there are several options available;

Can I mine bitcoin?

Mining bitcoins can be a fun learning experience, but be aware that you will most likely operate at a loss. Newcomers are often advised to stay away from mining unless they are only interested in it as a hobby similar to folding at home. If you want to learn more about mining you can read more here. Still have mining questions? The crew at /BitcoinMining would be happy to help you out.
If you want to contribute to the bitcoin network by hosting the blockchain and propagating transactions you can run a full node using this setup guide. Bitseed is an easy option for getting set up. You can view the global node distribution here.

Earning bitcoins

Just like any other form of money, you can also earn bitcoins by being paid to do a job.
Site Description
WorkingForBitcoins, Bitwage, XBTfreelancer, Cryptogrind, Bitlancerr, Coinality, Bitgigs, /Jobs4Bitcoins, Rein Project Freelancing
OpenBazaar, Purse.io, Bitify, /Bitmarket, 21 Market Marketplaces
Streamium.io, XOtika.tv NSFW, /GirlsGoneBitcoin NSFW Video Streaming
Bitasker, BitforTip Tasks
Supload.com, SatoshiBox, JoyStream, File Army File/Image Sharing
CoinAd, A-ads, Coinzilla.io Advertising
You can also earn bitcoins by participating as a market maker on JoinMarket by allowing users to perform CoinJoin transactions with your bitcoins for a small fee (requires you to already have some bitcoins)

Bitcoin Projects

The following is a short list of ongoing projects that might be worth taking a look at if you are interested in current development in the bitcoin space.
Project Description
Lightning Network, Amiko Pay, and Strawpay Payment channels for network scaling
Blockstream, Rootstock and Drivechain Sidechains
21, Inc. Open source library for the machine payable web
ShapeShift.io Trade between bitcoins and altcoins easily
Open Transactions, Counterparty, Omni, Open Assets, Symbiont and Chain Financial asset platforms
Hivemind and Augur Prediction markets
Mediachain Decentralized media library
Tierion and Factom Records & Titles on the blockchain
BitMarkets, DropZone, Beaver and Open Bazaar Decentralized markets
Samourai and Dark Wallet - abandoned Privacy-enhancing wallets
JoinMarket CoinJoin implementation (Increase privacy and/or Earn interest on bitcoin holdings)
Coinffeine and Bisq Decentralized bitcoin exchanges
Keybase and Bitrated Identity & Reputation management
Telehash Mesh networking
JoyStream BitTorrent client with paid seeding
MORPHiS Decentralized, encrypted internet
Storj and Sia Decentralized file storage
Streamium Pay in real time for on-demand services
Abra Global P2P money transmitter network
bitSIM PIN secure hardware token between SIM & Phone
Identifi Decentralized address book w/ ratings system
BitGo Multisig bitcoin API
Bitcore Open source Bitcoin javascript library
Insight Open source blockchain API
Leet Kill your friends and take their money ;)

Bitcoin Units

One Bitcoin is quite large (hundreds of £/$/€) so people often deal in smaller units. The most common subunits are listed below:
Unit Symbol Value Info
millibitcoin mBTC 1,000 per bitcoin SI unit for milli i.e. millilitre (mL) or millimetre (mm)
microbitcoin μBTC 1,000,000 per bitcoin SI unit for micro i.e microlitre (μL) or micrometre (μm)
bit bit 1,000,000 per bitcoin Colloquial "slang" term for microbitcoin
satoshi sat 100,000,000 per bitcoin Smallest unit in bitcoin, named after the inventor
For example, assuming an arbitrary exchange rate of $10000 for one Bitcoin, a $10 meal would equal:
For more information check out the Bitcoin units wiki.
Still have questions? Feel free to ask in the comments below or stick around for our weekly Mentor Monday thread. If you decide to post a question in /Bitcoin, please use the search bar to see if it has been answered before, and remember to follow the community rules outlined on the sidebar to receive a better response. The mods are busy helping manage our community so please do not message them unless you notice problems with the functionality of the subreddit. A complete list of bitcoin related subreddits can be found here
Note: This is a community created FAQ. If you notice anything missing from the FAQ or that requires clarification you can edit it here and it will be included in the next revision pending approval.
Welcome to the Bitcoin community and the new decentralized economy!
submitted by BinaryResult to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A 14-year-old's experience with Bitcoin

First-time poster here, don’t bully me, apologies for the potentially atrocious formatting :) TL;DR at the end
So in the wake of Bitcoin’s explosive rise in value and media attention, I’ve been encouraged by others to share my experience over the past few years as a miner. Here's my story (it's kinda long, you've been warned)

Humble Beginnings

It all started almost three years ago in the beginning of 2015 when Bitcoin flew under my radar. Looking into it, I admittedly wasn’t drawn in because of the decentralisation or the anonymous payments, I was hooked on the idea that anyone could get their hands on some just by running a program and leaving it to do its own thing. I know, how shallow of me. But the idea of making even a bit of money without ‘any work’ was convincing enough for 11-year-old me to do more digging into the matter.
To my disappointment, I soon found out that the era of mining Bitcoins with a PC’s CPU or GPU was long obsolete and instead it was all ASICs at that point.
So that summer, for my twelfth birthday, I got a little ASIC machine for €60, an Antminer U3. This little thing took up less space than a graphics card but could mine at 60 GH/s. Because, at the time, I didn’t have a controller device that could be kept up and running all day long so it could run the program that mined Bitcoin using the U3, I went ahead and got a Raspberry Pi. After setting up the Pi and installing all the necessary stuff (took an awfully long time), I connected it to AntPool and plugged the U3 in. Two days past and the mining pool sent the first Bitcoin I ever received to my wallet (I was using Blockchain.info). It was just 30 cents worth of BTC but I felt a bit of a rush because I was earning a bit of money through this completely new thing and the idea of that was thrilling.
Let’s back up for a second. I just used the term ‘earning’ as if I was profiting, and naive me 2 years ago was no different. In reality, I was at first oblivious to the fact that I was most likely LOSING money overall because of how much energy that little sucker was taking in. But, I was comforted thinking that using that machine was just a practical way of learning about this modern currency and that the loss of several cents’ worth of energy was acceptable in the name of education and learning.
Fast forward ten months to the wonderful summer of 2016. I had recently turned 13 and the Antminer U3 had been running on and off throughout. Various pauses and breaks in mining would be observed, as I had to manually get everything up and running after frequent breaks in the Internet connection. You’d expect my newly-turned-teenage brain to lose interest in Bitcoin as it does with many other gimmicks, but – even surprising myself – I miraculously didn’t. Good thing I maintained interest thinking about it now, not so good at the time for my parents. Why do I say this? I felt like it was time to get a little upgrade in my hardware.

Getting an upgrade

Days passed with me comparing every ASIC miner I could at that price point. It was then I set my eyes upon the Antminer S7 (same folks who did my U3, nice). I had put it up against a plethora of other miners and I figured the S7 was my best bet; the thing costs only about 10 times that of my U3 but could run at 4.73 TH/s, almost 80 times as powerful. The only problem being its power consumption was at 1300 watts, which would put a massive dent in the electricity bill and eliminate any profit I would make. Fortunately, I had a secret weapon up my sleeve – or rather my mum did. She had rented out an office outside our apartment where she would keep files and paperwork. The office’s electricity bill was a flat rate as far as I’m aware and it ended up being my saving grace because it virtually got rid of the “oh no I’m actually going to be losing money because of how much electricity I’m eating up” factor, making this whole hardware upgrade viable.
After convincing my parents, they finally agreed to shell out the requested amount, with the initial investment being paid back with time. I went to a local Bitcoin vendor and purchased 1 BTC for about $665 in cash (sigh yes, I know. $665 dollars). Shortly after, I used about 0.9 BTC to purchase the Antminer S7 and a 1600W power supply for a grand total of $600. The products would be made and shipped from China so I was definitely in for a wait.
A month passes and the package arrives at last. I connected all the wires from the power supply into the S7 and – with great anticipation – I plugged it into the wall to start its first ever run. And what do you know? An extremely loud and high-pitched whirring sound blasted out from the fans on both the power supply as well as the S7. After killing the thing, I questioned my choices. I couldn’t dare put that thing anywhere near my mum’s office in the event it drive everyone in the building absolutely nuts. I was at a loss. However, I soon recovered from my temporarily debilitated state and got working on a solution.
The first idea that came to my mind: change the fans. The stocks fans were by Evercool and spun at around 3000 RPM. The power supply used a small, robust fan that looked like a cube that must’ve spun at extremely high speeds judging by how high the sound it produced was. I got my parents to give me some more funding so I could acquire the replacement fans and I did. Bust. After installation and testing, none of the fans would work. I managed to configure the S7 to connect to my Antpool account and the machine would manage mining for several minutes running at peak performance but ultimately be automatically cut off because of how hot the machine was getting (I’m talking about 80 degrees Celsius kinda hot in that thing). The fans got refunded and I was back to the drawing board.
After combing through some forum posts and videos, I came across this video and a forum post in which people have their mining rigs placed inside a ventilated, muffled cabinet. Undertaking a project like this would be time-consuming and risky but I had no better ideas so I decided to go through with the idea anyway.
Firstly, I sought out a cabinet with suitable dimensions. I managed to get just what I needed at a second-hand IKEA shop. Great. Secondly, I went ahead and acquired some sound-absorbing acoustic foam from a local provider. Fantastic. Finally I had to get a ventilation system going within the cabinet, otherwise, all the hot air would roast the machine alive in there in a bloody mess. With the help of my dad, we found a pair cabinet fans on the Internet that were close to silent but could circulate the air well enough.
Eventually, all the materials came and, with the help of my parents, put everything together. The process took quite long time and we had a couple hiccups along the way, but we got it done and it came out pretty nice.
The moment of truth came and, to my relief, it ran so much quieter than without the cabinet. It was nowhere near silent but it reduced the noise a great deal. Soon after, I got the thing into the office and set everything up from there. Unfortunately, I was forced to underclock it because you could still hear the machine’s whining from outside the thin office door. Gunning the hashrate down about 25% to 3.7TH/s, I could lower the fan speed without risking the machine burning up. Sure, I wasn’t getting the full potential of the machine but I didn’t complain because electricity was not an issue there and it was still a whole lot better than my U3. With it up and running, I could leave it there, periodically checking to see if it was mining on Antpool.

The aftermath

In the months that followed, I was getting a solid $2.5 worth of BTC on daily basis. Half a year later, May of 2017, I had accumulated a satisfactory $600. I thought, “At this rate, I’d be able to pay my parents’ investment back in a few months” (the total investment came close to $900). Bitcoin had risen to over $1500 so I was already over the moon at that point because of how well everything was going. Little did I know…
I hit 0.5 BTC midway through September this year. The price of BTC had dropped after a sudden rise to $5000, but I couldn’t have asked for more. Although I possessed only half the amount of BTC I paid for the machine, its value was over twice that of the initial investment. I thought BTC would level off at around $4000 but nope.
In the month of October, the price skyrocketed. Since September, I had only mined 0.017 BTC but the value was already over $3000. It was just a matter of selling it, but I decided to hodl. Good thing I did.
As of November 5, I have approximately 0.52 BTC mined in total from my S7, valued at $4000. If I were to sell it right now, I’d have a profit of over $3100. And as for my miner, it’s churning out 0.0006 BTC daily, sounds like nothing but it’s still the equivalent of $5 today and I couldn’t be happier, at least with the miner and Bitcoin.
You remember that $665 for 1 BTC that I mentioned earlier? In hindsight, it would’ve been such a better idea to just keep that one Bitcoin and not do anything with it until today (in the interest of making much more money), as I’d theoretically have upwards of $7000. The idea of that still haunts me sometimes if I dwell on it too long but knowing that I’m in possession of an already hefty amount, the pain of it had numbed slightly. It’s not all doom and gloom for me from the exponential increase in Bitcoin’s value, however. Those first $0.3 payments from my humble little U3 all those years ago now are now the equivalent of over $6 today!
Bitcoin and everything it encompasses has been and still is a journey of discovery and an adventure. Looking back, starting with a modest €60 Antminer U3 to having a sum of Bitcoin equivalent to two extremely high-end gaming rigs (first thing I could think of as a comparison, sorry) has been something I can’t really describe. Through the course of the past few years, I’ve learned more about technology, I’ve unexpectedly gotten insight into economics and business and – of course – I’ve made a lot of money (if I decide to stop hodling that is).
Also, props to my parents for keeping an open mind throughout, I know some parents would be horrified at their kids being involved in something that has been used in some less-than-savoury ways and it's great knowing mine have been supportive all the way.
TL;DR got into Bitcoin mining 3 years ago at age 11 with an Antminer U3 that ran at 60 GH/s, got an Antminer S7 (4.73TH/s) and built a sound-muffling, ventilated cabinet for it. Am sat here today with $3000 profit if I decide to sell right now.
submitted by xx_riptide_xx to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Spock & CoinEx AMA Recap

Spock & CoinEx AMA Recap

https://preview.redd.it/1lagrcjnc9o31.png?width=1074&format=png&auto=webp&s=3136db9ca685dc17477d307df722e5b73ba80030
Spock Network is a decentralized storage platform. In the early stage, Spock Network mainly stores Proof of Capacity (POC) consensus data to effectively utilize the most suitable decentralization technology to encourage miners providing hard disk space. Recently, Spock has been growing rapidly and getting listed on four famous exchanges including CoinEx. On Sept. 19, CoinEx will launch Accelerator for Spock, allowing users to subscribe SPOK with 0.0075 USD. Besides, in order to help our users to dig more about Spock, we have invited the open source code contributor of Spock, Titian Xie, to throw an AMA among our community. Below is the recap of the AMA and enjoy your reading!

Q1: How will Spock solve the existing problems in blockchain?
A: Spock is a decentralized storage application network. Judged from the current development of blockchain technology, PoC is the only choice for a decentralized incentive mechanism in a distributed network composed of a large amount of hard disk space and bandwidth. On one hand, this solves the problem of excessive power consumption in the current mining industry, and on the other hand, it solves the problem of fair competition among a large number of existing hard-disk mining machines. At the same time, on that basis, Spock also supports Solidity smart contracts, which makes the entire ecosystem more prosperous.
Q2: Could you please say something about the team?
A: The core members of our team are all early users on Bitcointalk forum and developers of Burst. They are very familiar with the technology development trend and the details of the bottom of the blockchain technology. Even I with such a R&D background could only throw myself down at their feet in admiration. Their ideals are also very pure, that is, to make Spock a community coin like Bitcoin and Litecoin.
Q3: Community building has just started. What will you do to build the social media that remain active and continuously focus on Spock?
A: Spock is a decentralized application platform. The community also relies on spontaneous word of mouth. Since Spock was put on the test net and later on the main net, many miners and holders have spontaneously joined in to become owners, and maintained and promoted the community. The upcoming Solidity smart contracts can be carried out by polling among the holders, and members of the community will vote through the smart contract to determine the project function expansion and community governance.
Q4: Spock is a decentralized storage application platform, so what advantages does it have compared with the traditional centralized storage platform?
A: Traditional centralized storage platforms generally adopt cloud storage. Most of the data is stored on a few cloud platforms, which leads to serious centralization problems arising from data accumulation. There are also problems including higher cost, slower transfer rate, and poorer data security. The decentralized storage application platform encrypts and distributes data through a distributed network, meaning that no party, other than the data holder, could get access to the data, thus ensuring security. And one of the key issues is that the open decentralized platform can do better in protecting private data. As with the case of the assets of the digital assets of Huobi, the private key represents the ownership of the assets, and, on the decentralized storage platform, it can represent the disposition and access rights of the data.
Q5: Spock adopts the consensus mechanism of PoC. What advantages and disadvantages does PoC have compared with PoW and PoS?
A: In terms of resource usage, PoC is just between PoW and PoS, unlike PoW which consumes a lot of power, or PoS that almost costs nothing. Besides, since the core mechanism of PoC is similar to storing the “hashrate” of PoW on the hard disk, it also makes it possible for the mining equipment to mine in different projects at the same time, provided that several different projects use the same data structure.
Q6: We noticed that Spock also introduced the PoS mechanism on the basis of PoC. What is the consideration?
A: With the POS mechanism added in SPOCK, when a miner package a block, if its address balance satisfies the condition, he or she get get all the proceeds; otherwise, the proceeds will be reduced, and those that fail to meet the conditions will be destroyed. So in my opinion, developers introduce POS mechanisms to create a more equitable and sustainable ecosystem.
Q7: What will the team do to attract more developers to join the Spock ecosystem?
A: Spock is the first public link that supports the Solidity Smart Contract and has been put on the main net. It allows developers to port the DApp on the Ethernet to the network at a very low cost, while developers can design the mining and pledge mechanisms for the tokens of PoC distributed on this network.
Q8: What is the form of Spock mining? What are the conditions for miner application?
A: In SPOCK, mining is carried out through the storage device. First, you write the result of the hash calculation to the device, and reduce the huge hash calculation required in PoW algorithm by retrieving the data in the hard disk. Only a small amount of hash calculation will be required in execution stage. You can mine as long as you have storage equipment and meet the hashrate conditions. Ordinary miners just need an ordinary computer with a hard disk and access to the internet, then they need to go through hard drive mapping, download the wallet, install nodes and so on before mining.
Q9: I am a Windows phone user. How do I download a SPOK wallet?
A: At present there is only the Android version. Versions of other platforms are subject to the official arrangement.
Q10: Miners don’t know how much hashrate they have or how much they could pledge.
A: Check http://www.spockpool.com. There is a calculator to check the amount of pledges required for the time being.
Q11: Does the mining cost anything or a certain amount of SPOK tokens?
A: Now we have a market for cooperative mining. Miners can borrow tokens from owners for mortgage.
Q12: Is there a detailed tutorial for mining?
A:https://www.spockchain.org/download/SpockChain%20Mining%20Tutorial%20V1.3.2.pdf
Q13: What are the advantages compared with Lambda or such? The larger the hard disk, the higher the hashrate?
A: My suggestion is to experience the mining process on both official sites so you may understand the differences between them.
Q14: Can we use the Raspberry Pi to mine at home?
A: Yes, theoretically. Yet the weak computing power of Raspberry Pi itself may affect efficiency in hard drive mapping.

This is the end of the sharing. See you next time!
If you have any suggestions, please submit a Ticket here: https://support.coinex.com/hc/en-us/requests/new
submitted by CoinExcom to Coinex [link] [comments]

Groestlcoin June Development Update & Release!

Another Quarter, Another Release! The Groestlcoin production factory has been working overtime as always in order to deliver even more tech to push Groestlcoin mainstream when the time comes.
There have been many new fantastic wallets and exchanges added to Groestlcoins repertoire over the past 3 months so we will re-cap these before moving on to what is new today.

Recap

What's New

Re-forged: Groestlcoin Samourai

Groestlcoin Samourai is a wallet for the streets. A modern Groestlcoin wallet hand-forged to keep your transactions private, your identity masked, and your funds secure. Its main advantages are its extreme portability and is the most secure Groestlcoin mobile HD wallet.
We've built a wallet that Groestlcoin deserves. If you are looking for a wallet that Silicon Valley will never build, the regulators will never allow, and the VC's will never invest in, this is the perfect wallet for you.
![Groestlcoin Samourai Release Video](http://img.youtube.com/vi/i3WU8Tde8XQ/0.jpg)

Head over to the Groestlcoin Samourai Release Page here for the full release announcement.

New: GroestlImage

Groestlimage turns any file into a mnemonic phrase allowing users to generate Groestlcoin private keys and addresses based on the data URI of the provided file. A picture is worth a thousand Groestls.

Features:

Link

https://groestlcoin.org/groestlimage/

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/groestlimage

New: Groestlcoin Core Config Generator

Groestlcoin Core Config Generator is a simple GUI to configure the groestlcoin.conf file – A developers dream tool!
Each configuration option is available via the user interface, grouped by what attributes they affect. For ease of getting started with a new configuration, a variety of preset "node classes" are available on the right-hand-side of the screen. Selecting a preset will load our recommended base configuration for a node fitting that description, at which point you can then tune the configuration at the single option level.

Features

Link

https://config.groestlcoin.org/

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/groestlcoin-core-config-generator

New: Groestlcoin Dumb Block Explorer

Dumb Block Explorer is a trivial block explorer written in a single PHP file. Now everybody can run their own block explorer.

Features

Link

https://www.groestlcoin.org/explore

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/dumb-block-explorer

New: Groestlcoin SMS Push TX

Groestlcoin Simple Push TX is a server to push Groestlcoin transactions via SMS. Now everybody can send new transactions via SMS if the Internet is not usable (i.e. blocked by government entities or becomes otherwise unavailable).

Features

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/smspushtx

Update: Electrum-GRS 3.3.6

Electrum-GRS is Groestlcoins #1 thin-client for Windows, MacOS, Linux and Android, based on a client-server protocol. Supporting multi-sig wallets without the bloat of downloading the entire blockchain.

New Features (Universal)

New Features (Windows, MacOS, Linux)

New Features (Android)

Link

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/electrum-grs/releases/download
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.groestlcoin.electrumgrs

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/electrum-grs
submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

r/Bitcoin recap - April 2018

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the sixteenth monthly Bitcoin news recap.
It's easy for news and developments to get drowned out by price talk, so each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in Bitcoin over the past month. Lots of gems this time around!
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in April 2018
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Hash Rate in the News - PoW vs. PoS – 431 OMG!

Hash Rate in the News
With the announcement that Bitmain will offer ASIC miners for Ethereum, climbing hash rates are in the news. Briefly, hash rate is the number of hash calculations made per second across an entire cryptocurrency network. For Proof of Work (PoW) networks (we will get to Proof of Stake below) hash rate scales linearly with carbon footprint and Proof of Environmental Damage.
Let’s look at some current PoW hash rates:
Bitcoin 25.5 EH/s (quintillion), or 25,500,000,000,000,000,000 hashes per second.
Ethereum 256 TH/s (trillion), or 256,000,000,000,000 hashes per second.
Now let’s look at environmentally-friendly Qtum Proof of Stake (PoS) mining. For Qtum PoS mining, each full node securing the network does one SHA256 hash calculation every 16 seconds. We can easily calculate the network hash rate for Qtum as approximately
6,900 nodes / 16 seconds = 431 hashes per second!
This uber-low hash rate also explains why Qtum can be successfully mined with minimal computer resources, such as on a Raspberry Pi.
Save the hashes, save the environment,
Jackson
blog post on Medium
submitted by realJB395 to Qtum [link] [comments]

BBPWebMining.com

TOTALLY OPEN TO SUGGESTIONS AND FEATURES!
Get BBP from a miner in a browser on any device that takes decent javascript.

phones, raspberry pis, wierd computers, you get the picture
Website
BBPWebMining.com

Putting an address to the url (or submitting one) will cause the miner to use the autostart parameter.

Mine directly to Your Address
http://www.bbpwebmining.com/?u=YOURADDRESS-------------- 
Mine directly to Orphans Address
http://www.bbpwebmining.com/?u=BB2BwSbDCqCqNsfc7FgWFJn4sRgnUt4tsM 
Mine directly to My Address
http://www.bbpwebmining.com/?u=BKNBGJPnaxJRU415wUU6yEJuxxwwTEUsVn 
IFrame for Websites - Replace YOURADDRESS
 
IFrame for Websites - Orphans Address
 
IFrame for Websites - My Address
 
My Faq:
Q: Who Made This? A: I did. BKNBGJPnaxJRU415wUU6yEJuxxwwTEUsVn Q: How does this work? A: Short answer, your mining XMR, im giving you BBP. Q: What are your rates? A: Fair, self-evident, not hard to figure out. Q: Why? A: BBP - Orphans - Etc. Q: What is BBP - Bitcoin - Cryptocurrency? A: biblepay.org - bitcoin.com - youtube.com Q: Is this legit, when do I get paid? A: Yes! you could receieve your payment between 1 min and 24 hours. typically quick. Manual. Q: Does this work on AKA such and such device? A: Probably (javascript) Hit the button and find out. Q: Can I have a copy of your script? A: No. Q: Can I purchase your script? A: Maybe. Q: Whats The Meaning Of Life. A: In This Reality, God Loves Us So Much He Sent His Son To Die For Us, So We Could Be Saved! Q: Whats The Meaning Of Life. A: The Love Of God. 

BBPWebMining.com

PS

Im live on the only BBP live chat from another user, case you got questions.

http://anadoe.com:3000/channel/biblepay-main

DONATE: BKNBGJPnaxJRU415wUU6yEJuxxwwTEUsVn
submitted by requiredtruth to BiblePay [link] [comments]

Monero mining, the road to hell.

You know it started out innocent enough. One friend at work started talking innocently about Monero and before I knew it I had hooked the work PC up to Minergate and had started mining. After I day I saw Moneros slowly ticking in and felt that it needed to go faster, so I downloaded the client as well on my gaming PC at home, but I wasn't able to use the graphic card, the Moneros were still ticking in at a too slow rate.
I did some more reading and found out that Minergate was the devil, that the way to go about this was to set up my own wallet and mine using a client, directly toward a pool. First I created a web-wallet, but then I remember MtGox and all the trouble with bitcoins being lost, so I created a shell wallet on my file server at home and downloaded a few clients, compiled, compared, tuned and after a while I started to see some real Monero dripping in. I managed to get the NVidia miner up on my gaming rig with the juicy 980Ti card and that really made the difference, but I wanted more.
I work with grid solutions/high performance computing and at work we have a lab where I can basically set up whatever equipment that I want (within reason) and latch on to work's power grid. I decided to set up a dual GPU system and just leave it running in the lab area where we have the consoles and do general close proximity work to make things work in the real lab. I did not have a casing so I ordered everything I needed and after some troubleshooting (BIOS did not support the Kaby Lake CPU) I got things up and running on 2xRX480 cards, nicely hashing in on about 630H/s on each card.
In the mean time, to maximize my Monero flow I had turned every device, work and private into CPU and GPU miners, every clock tick squeezed for maximum utilization and at one point I even ran clients on useless Raspberry PIs, slow file servers and Beagle Bone Internet of Things cards, yielding no more than 3-6 H/s. It all added up, but I still needed more.
I started looking into building a real mining rig. I ordered an AMD Motherboard, more PSUs, CPU, RAM, USB risers, etc. and I got a rig frame flown in from China at a reasonable price. In the meantime I had already ordered another RX480 which were idling on my work desk while I was building the rig. The rig was being set up at my work desk, sitting next to my work PC which also was mining Monero at full capacity when I wasn't at work. GPU mining needs to be off if the system is to be used without severe graphics lag.
I had installed 2 GPU clients on my home system as well, one that really bogged down the system, rendering it unusable for anything except mining, the other setting I could easily do other work, web-browsing and such without too much lag from the graphic cards. Whenever I left for work or went to sleep I put the heavy load version on, and when I got home from work or woke up in the morning, my living room was warm and cozy, at least 4-5'C above the usual.
By now I had gathered 5 GPUs which had completely filled up my mining rig. Achievement unlocked! Although I still had some debugging work to do on it (random crashes) it still would run smoothly most of the time. The Monero is pouring in, about $10 USD worth of Monero each day, from both my rig and the myriad of fileservers, gaming and work PCs, and stupid little devices that were designed for completely different things. The value of Monero had increased from about $12 USD to $30 USD during this time, everything was with a promising outlook.
Then, yesterday it occurred to me, I did move 2 cards from the first PC that I bought, to the mining rig, which means that I could get two new cards and put into that one. So, I have just ordered myself two more RX480 (which by the way are much nicer for Monero mining than the RX580s) and as I am sitting here, having just ordered those cards, I am already planning the next step, moving the first motherboard out of the PC and latch it on to a rig and connect 2 more cards (it's a mATX motherboard with 4 PCI-e slots)
But now, I am wondering, where will this all end? Have I become a Monero mining addict? How many rigs and graphic cards do I need to finally feel satisfied? When do I get enough? And will this short term bankrupt me completely? Well, at least I am not using money on booze, drugs or hookers, but it still feels like an addiction.
Any words of advice or comfort appreciated...
submitted by bloodwire to MoneroMining [link] [comments]

Here's a list of 520+ free online programming/CS courses (MOOCs) with feedback(i.e. exams/homeworks/assignments) that you can start this month (October 2016)

Unfortunately I couldn't fit all the courses here because of Reddit's 40,000 character limit. So I removed older self-paced courses from the list. These courses are always open for registration.
They can be found here:
~300 Self Paced Programming and Computer Science courses
I have also started categorizing the courses listed here by the programming language they are taught in. You can find the list here:
~250 MOOCs categorized by Programming Language
This is not the complete list of MOOCs starting in October 2016, just the ones relevant to this community. The complete list of courses starting in October 2016 can be found over at Class Central (1800+ courses). I maintain a much bigger list of these courses over at Class Central
Get this list every month via email : Subscribe
NOTE: Unfortunately Coursera has converted many of its courses to 'Premium Grading'. Which basically means that you need to pay if you want to access graded assignments :(. You can also apply for Financial Aid - https://learner.coursera.help/hc/en-us/articles/209819033-Apply-for-Financial-Aid
BEGINNER(28)
Course Name Start Date Length (in weeks) Rating
AP® Computer Science Principles via edX Self paced NA NA
Introduction to CSS3 via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 4.6★ (7)
[NEW] Introduction to Web Development via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Internet History, Technology, and Security via Coursera 3rd Oct 10 4.6★ (28)
Data to Insight: an Introduction to Data Analysis via FutureLearn 3rd Oct 8 4★ (2)
Programming Foundations with JavaScript, HTML and CSS via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.8★ (9)
Introduction to Cyber Security via FutureLearn 3rd Oct 8 4.2★ (18)
Introduction to Programming with Java, Part 1: Starting to Code with Java via edX 4th Oct NA 3★ (2)
How To Create a Website in a Weekend! (Project-Centered Course) via Coursera 10th Oct 3 5★ (1)
Ruby on Rails: An Introduction via Coursera 10th Oct 3 3.1★ (48)
Learn to Code for Data Analysis via FutureLearn 10th Oct 4 3★ (1)
Build a Modern Computer from First Principles: From Nand to Tetris (Project-Centered Course) via Coursera 10th Oct 6 4.8★ (12)
Code Yourself! An Introduction to Programming via Coursera 10th Oct 5 4.3★ (6)
CODAPPS: Coding mobile apps for entrepreneurs via Coursera 10th Oct 8 5★ (1)
[NEW] Python Programming: A Concise Introduction via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
HTML, CSS, and Javascript for Web Developers via Coursera 10th Oct 5 5★ (4)
HTML, CSS and JavaScript via Coursera 10th Oct 3 4.1★ (13)
Introduction to HTML5 via Coursera 10th Oct 3 4.1★ (30)
Introduction to the Internet of Things and Embedded Systems via Coursera 10th Oct 4 3.7★ (6)
An Introduction to Interactive Programming in Python (Part 2) via Coursera 17th Oct 4 4.8★ (40)
Usable Security via Coursera 17th Oct 7 2.9★ (8)
Introduction to Programming with MATLAB via Coursera 17th Oct 9 4.9★ (141)
An Introduction to Interactive Programming in Python (Part 1) via Coursera 17th Oct 5 4.9★ (2816)
Creative Programming for Digital Media & Mobile Apps via Coursera 24th Oct NA 4★ (10)
[NEW] AP Computer Science A: Java Programming Data Structures and Loops via edX 24th Oct NA NA
Learn to Program: The Fundamentals via Coursera 24th Oct 10 4.8★ (81)
Introduction à la programmation orientée objet (en Java) via Coursera 24th Oct 7 5★ (1)
Begin Programming: Build Your First Mobile Game via FutureLearn 31st Oct 7 3.9★ (7)
INTERMEDIATE(154)
Course Name Start Date Length (in weeks) Rating
M233: Getting Started with Spark and MongoDB via MongoDB University Self paced NA NA
Android Basics: Data Storage via Udacity Self paced NA NA
[NEW] Essential Design Principles for Tableau via Coursera 1st Oct NA NA
Software Defined Networking via Coursera 1st Oct NA 4★ (5)
Client Needs and Software Requirements via Coursera 1st Oct 4 4.3★ (6)
Client Needs and Software Requirements via Coursera 1st Oct 4 4.3★ (6)
Agile Planning for Software Products via Coursera 1st Oct 4 3★ (2)
VLSI CAD Part I: Logic via Coursera 1st Oct 10 5★ (3)
Software Processes and Agile Practices via Coursera 1st Oct 4 4.3★ (9)
Introduction to Software Product Management via Coursera 1st Oct 2 4.2★ (10)
Reviews & Metrics for Software Improvements via Coursera 1st Oct 4 NA
Discrete Optimization via Coursera 2nd Oct 9 4.3★ (11)
Internet Emerging Technologies via Coursera 3rd Oct 3 3★ (2)
Java Programming: Arrays, Lists, and Structured Data via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 4.3★ (3)
Multiplatform Mobile App Development with Web Technologies via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 5★ (1)
Responsive Web Design via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.3★ (10)
Big Data Integration and Processing via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Robotic Vision via EdCast 3rd Oct 9 4.8★ (4)
Algorithms on Strings via Coursera 3rd Oct NA 3★ (1)
Introduction To Swift Programming via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 1.2★ (5)
Fundamentals of Visualization with Tableau via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Mastering the Software Engineering Interview via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 5★ (1)
Cloud Computing Applications, Part 1: Cloud Systems and Infrastructure via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 3.4★ (7)
Data Management and Visualization via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 2.4★ (5)
Cryptography via Coursera 3rd Oct 7 4.2★ (6)
Managing Data Analysis via Coursera 3rd Oct 1 1.8★ (6)
iOS App Development Basics via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 4★ (2)
Data Analysis Tools via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3★ (3)
Principles of Machine Learning via edX 3rd Oct NA NA
Testing with Agile via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Internet of Things: How did we get here? via Coursera 3rd Oct 2 2★ (5)
Cloud Computing Concepts: Part 2 via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 4.8★ (4)
Cybersecurity and Mobility via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Data Science in Real Life via Coursera 3rd Oct 1 3★ (8)
Introduction to Meteor.js Development via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 5★ (3)
[NEW] The R Programming Environment via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Big Data: Mathematical Modelling via FutureLearn 3rd Oct 2 NA
Process Mining: Data science in Action via Coursera 3rd Oct 6 4.3★ (12)
[NEW] Programming Languages, Part C via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Big Data, Cloud Computing, & CDN Emerging Technologies via Coursera 3rd Oct 3 3.3★ (4)
Wireless Communication Emerging Technologies via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 3.7★ (3)
Algorithms, Part I via Coursera 3rd Oct 6 4.4★ (37)
Running Product Design Sprints via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 NA
Internet of Things & Augmented Reality Emerging Technologies via Coursera 3rd Oct 2 2.5★ (2)
R Programming via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 2.7★ (210)
The Data Scientist’s Toolbox via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.2★ (141)
Getting and Cleaning Data via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.4★ (47)
Practical Machine Learning via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.4★ (20)
Exploratory Data Analysis via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.8★ (32)
Cybersecurity and the X-Factor via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Regression Models via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 2.6★ (27)
Statistical Inference via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 2.7★ (26)
Dealing With Missing Data via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Reproducible Research via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.7★ (22)
Machine Learning via Coursera 3rd Oct 11 4.8★ (204)
Internet of Things: Setting Up Your DragonBoard™ Development Platform via Coursera 3rd Oct 10 3★ (3)
Introduction to Big Data via Coursera 3rd Oct 3 2.6★ (27)
Algorithms: Design and Analysis, Part 1 via Coursera 3rd Oct 6 4.7★ (52)
Algorithmic Toolbox via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 4.7★ (6)
Cryptography I via Coursera 3rd Oct 7 4.7★ (38)
A Crash Course in Data Science via Coursera 3rd Oct 1 3.3★ (14)
Data Visualization and Communication with Tableau via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 4★ (7)
Java Programming: Solving Problems with Software via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.3★ (8)
Database Management Essentials via Coursera 3rd Oct 7 3.8★ (4)
Hadoop Platform and Application Framework via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 1.9★ (19)
Front-End Web UI Frameworks and Tools via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 4.3★ (6)
Algorithms: Design and Analysis, Part 2 via Coursera 3rd Oct 6 4.8★ (16)
A developer's guide to the Internet of Things (IoT) via Coursera 3rd Oct NA 4★ (1)
Java for Android via Coursera 4th Oct 4 NA
Data Visualization via Coursera 10th Oct 4 3.2★ (15)
Framework for Data Collection and Analysis via Coursera 10th Oct NA 3.5★ (2)
Interactivity with JavaScript via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4.3★ (6)
Responsive Website Basics: Code with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript via Coursera 10th Oct 4 3.9★ (20)
Introduction to Spreadsheets and Models via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4.7★ (3)
Functional Program Design in Scala via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
The Raspberry Pi Platform and Python Programming for the Raspberry Pi via Coursera 10th Oct 4 3.5★ (2)
Biology Meets Programming: Bioinformatics for Beginners via Coursera 10th Oct 4 5★ (5)
Best Practices for iOS User Interface Design via Coursera 10th Oct 4 5★ (1)
Algorithms on Graphs via Coursera 10th Oct NA 4★ (1)
Big Data Modeling and Management Systems via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
Advanced Algorithms and Complexity via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
Java Programming: Principles of Software Design via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4.7★ (3)
Programming Mobile Applications for Android Handheld Systems: Part 2 via Coursera 10th Oct 5 4.5★ (12)
Interfacing with the Arduino via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4★ (4)
Toward the Future of iOS Development with Swift via Coursera 10th Oct 4 NA
Advanced Data Structures in Java via Coursera 10th Oct 5 NA
Interfacing with the Raspberry Pi via Coursera 10th Oct 4 1★ (1)
Web Application Development with JavaScript and MongoDB via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4.2★ (5)
Data Manipulation at Scale: Systems and Algorithms via Coursera 10th Oct 4 2.5★ (4)
Data Structures and Performance via Coursera 10th Oct 5 5★ (3)
Approximation Algorithms Part I via Coursera 10th Oct 5 5★ (2)
Getting Started: Agile Meets Design Thinking via Coursera 10th Oct 5 5★ (1)
Text Retrieval and Search Engines via Coursera 10th Oct 4 3.2★ (5)
Games, Sensors and Media via Coursera 10th Oct 4 NA
Advanced Styling with Responsive Design via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4.7★ (3)
Beginning Game Programming with C# via Coursera 10th Oct 12 3.4★ (14)
Programming Mobile Applications for Android Handheld Systems: Part 1 via Coursera 10th Oct 5 4.1★ (35)
Managing an Agile Team via Coursera 10th Oct NA 2★ (1)
Cybersecurity and the Internet of Things via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
Data Warehouse Concepts, Design, and Data Integration via Coursera 10th Oct 5 5★ (1)
Responsive Website Tutorial and Examples via Coursera 10th Oct 4 5★ (1)
App Design and Development for iOS via Coursera 10th Oct 5 3★ (2)
Foundations of Objective-C App Development via Coursera 10th Oct 4 3★ (2)
Functional Programming Principles in Scala via Coursera 10th Oct 7 4.8★ (45)
Ruby on Rails Web Services and Integration with MongoDB via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4.8★ (4)
Object Oriented Programming in Java via Coursera 10th Oct 6 4.8★ (10)
Build Your First Android App (Project-Centered Course) via Coursera 10th Oct 5 3★ (1)
Managing Big Data with MySQL via Coursera 10th Oct 5 3.8★ (5)
Rails with Active Record and Action Pack via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4★ (1)
Data Structures via Coursera 10th Oct 4 2★ (2)
Single Page Web Applications with AngularJS via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
Software Architecture for the Internet of Things via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
The Arduino Platform and C Programming via Coursera 10th Oct 4 3.3★ (7)
Cloud Computing Concepts, Part 1 via Coursera 10th Oct 5 2.6★ (17)
Server-side Development with NodeJS via Coursera 10th Oct 4 5★ (1)
Mining Massive Datasets via Stanford OpenEdx 11th Oct 7 4.6★ (17)
M101J: MongoDB for Java Developers via MongoDB University 11th Oct 7 4.5★ (15)
M101JS: MongoDB for Node.js Developers via MongoDB University 11th Oct 7 4.4★ (8)
M101N: MongoDB for .NET Developers via MongoDB University 11th Oct NA 4★ (3)
M101P: MongoDB for Developers via MongoDB University 11th Oct 7 4.8★ (8)
M102: MongoDB for DBAs via MongoDB University 11th Oct 7 4.5★ (8)
M202: MongoDB Advanced Deployment and Operations via MongoDB University 11th Oct 7 5★ (4)
Software Security via Coursera 17th Oct 6 4.7★ (20)
Global Warming II: Create Your Own Models in Python via Coursera 17th Oct 5 2★ (1)
Programming Languages, Part A via Coursera 17th Oct NA 4.9★ (16)
Algorithmic Thinking (Part 1) via Coursera 17th Oct 4 4.1★ (13)
C++ For C Programmers, Part B via Coursera 17th Oct NA NA
Interactive Computer Graphics via Coursera 17th Oct 8 3.5★ (2)
[NEW] Advanced R Programming via Coursera 17th Oct NA NA
Principles of Computing (Part 1) via Coursera 17th Oct 5 4.6★ (25)
[NEW] How to Win Coding Competitions: Secrets of Champions via edX 17th Oct NA NA
Front-End JavaScript Frameworks: AngularJS via Coursera 17th Oct 4 3.8★ (4)
Internet of Things: Communication Technologies via Coursera 17th Oct 4 3★ (2)
Algorithmic Thinking (Part 2) via Coursera 17th Oct NA 4.4★ (8)
Introduction to Neurohacking In R via Coursera 17th Oct NA NA
Cloud Networking via Coursera 17th Oct 5 4.3★ (3)
Introduction to Architecting Smart IoT Devices via Coursera 17th Oct NA NA
Principles of Computing (Part 2) via Coursera 17th Oct NA 4.3★ (14)
Programming Languages, Part B via Coursera 17th Oct NA NA
[NEW] Internet of Things for Active Aging via FutureLearn 17th Oct NA NA
[NEW] Cyber Security Economics via edX 19th Oct NA NA
Introduction to Computational Thinking and Data Science via edX 19th Oct 9 4.4★ (20)
Genomic Data Science with Galaxy via Coursera 24th Oct 4 1.8★ (11)
Bioinformatics: Introduction and Methods 生物信息学: 导论与方法 via Coursera 24th Oct 14 NA
Web Application Development: Basic Concepts via Coursera 24th Oct NA NA
Python for Genomic Data Science via Coursera 24th Oct 4 2.4★ (11)
Introduction to Genomic Technologies via Coursera 24th Oct 4 2.7★ (10)
[NEW] Julia Scientific Programming via Coursera 24th Oct NA NA
Introduction to Data Science in Python via Coursera 24th Oct NA NA
Computer Architecture via Coursera 24th Oct 11 4.5★ (4)
Statistics for Genomic Data Science via Coursera 24th Oct 4 2★ (2)
C++ For C Programmers, Part A via Coursera 24th Oct NA 3.2★ (9)
Документы и презентации в LaTeX (Introduction to LaTeX) via Coursera 31st Oct 5 NA
Big Data: Data Visualisation via FutureLearn 31st Oct 2 NA
ADVANCED(42)
Course Name Start Date Length (in weeks) Rating
Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency Technologies via Coursera 1st Oct 7 4.6★ (9)
[NEW] Nature, in Code: Biology in JavaScript via edX 1st Oct NA NA
[NEW] Recommender Systems: Evaluation and Metrics via Coursera 1st Oct NA NA
Nearest Neighbor Collaborative Filtering via Coursera 1st Oct NA NA
Machine Learning: Clustering & Retrieval via Coursera 3rd Oct NA 4.5★ (2)
Big Data Science with the BD2K-LINCS Data Coordination and Integration Center via Coursera 3rd Oct 7 4★ (1)
Text Mining and Analytics via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.7★ (6)
Embedded Hardware and Operating Systems via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
System Validation: Automata and behavioural equivalences via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Machine Learning for Data Analysis via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3★ (3)
Neural Networks for Machine Learning via Coursera 3rd Oct 8 4.5★ (11)
Quantitative Formal Modeling and Worst-Case Performance Analysis via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 4★ (2)
Advanced Linear Models for Data Science 1: Least Squares via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Developing Data Products via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.9★ (16)
Cluster Analysis in Data Mining via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 2.6★ (5)
Machine Learning: Regression via Coursera 3rd Oct 6 4.7★ (13)
Introduction to Natural Language Processing via Coursera 3rd Oct NA 3.8★ (6)
Regression Modeling in Practice via Coursera 7th Oct 4 5★ (2)
Parallel programming via Coursera 10th Oct NA 5★ (1)
Pattern Discovery in Data Mining via Coursera 10th Oct 4 2.2★ (19)
Finding Hidden Messages in DNA (Bioinformatics I) via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4.5★ (16)
Graph Analytics for Big Data via Coursera 10th Oct 4 2.4★ (5)
Introduction to Recommender Systems: Non-Personalized and Content-Based via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
Nearest Neighbor Collaborative Filtering via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
Practical Predictive Analytics: Models and Methods via Coursera 10th Oct 4 2.5★ (2)
Hardware Security via Coursera 10th Oct 6 3★ (9)
Approximation Algorithms Part II via Coursera 10th Oct 4 NA
Cloud Computing Applications, Part 2: Big Data and Applications in the Cloud via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
Genomic Data Science and Clustering (Bioinformatics V) via Coursera 10th Oct 2 3.5★ (2)
[NEW] Big Data, Genes, and Medicine via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
Genome Sequencing (Bioinformatics II) via Coursera 10th Oct 4 5★ (3)
Machine Learning Foundations: A Case Study Approach via Coursera 10th Oct 6 4.2★ (30)
Relational Database Support for Data Warehouses via Coursera 10th Oct 5 2★ (1)
[NEW] Quantum Cryptography via edX 10th Oct NA NA
[NEW] Introduction to OpenStack via edX 12th Oct NA NA
Machine Learning: Classification via Coursera 17th Oct 7 4.8★ (6)
Bioconductor for Genomic Data Science via Coursera 24th Oct 4 3.3★ (3)
Advanced Java Concurrency via Coursera 24th Oct NA NA
Computational Neuroscience via Coursera 24th Oct 8 3.8★ (6)
Algorithms for DNA Sequencing via Coursera 24th Oct 4 4.5★ (16)
Probabilistic Graphical Models 1: Representation via Coursera 31st Oct 11 4.4★ (10)
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What is SHA256?  Bitcoin mining using Raspberry Pi Raspberry Pi Bitcoin mining ( Monero XMR Coin ) PART1 ... Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Mining Experiment  CONCLUSION How to make a Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Mining Rig - YouTube

To make a Raspberry Pi bitcoin mining rig,For deploying the mining Rig in 2018, you will need Raspberry Pi ,A pool account , USB Bitcoin miner,Bitcoin Wallet Raspbian image SD card.When the installation is complete, you just have to save a file named wallet.dat, . this way make a Raspberry Pi bitcoin mining rig. Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Miner ( Monero XMR ) What is Bitcoin Mining? With Bitcoin, miners use special software to solve math problems and are issued a certain number of bitcoins in exchange. This provides a smart way to issue the currency and also creates an incentive for more people to mine. ... If Raspberry pi has hash rate are 10 H/s see table ... For those considering Raspberry, Pi 3 B+ is the most recommended for mining crypto. Mining Bitcoin with Raspberry Pi won't generate profits because of the huge difficulty of mining. It may require you to add USB Bitcoin miner ($20-$400 USD) in addition to having a pool account and wallet. Mining for Pi Coin takes almost no effort but to simply make a single tap on the lightning symbol once a day. After that, you can continue to use your phone as normal or shut the screen off. Every Pi coin is continuously mined for the next 24 hours in the background of your device without using massive amounts of energy unlike mining for Bitcoin. And it turns out that the Pi is a very cheap and efficient way to control and monitor devices which are better suited to mining Bitcoins – like the new, thumb-drive-sized ASIC Bitcoin miners that have started appearing on the market recently, which mine at a similar rate to a fast graphics card.

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What is SHA256? Bitcoin mining using Raspberry Pi

The raspberry pi I used in 2015 to mine Bitcoin has made money after all! ... Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Mining Experiment CONCLUSION ... With the benefit of the recent climb in price the Bitcoin ... Bitcoin Mining using Raspberry Pi explains to you about bitcoin mining from its very basics. Initially, you will learn about all the different terminologies associated with the mining process. Learn how to make a Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Mining Rig. Hardware: 330Mh/z GPU - http://goo.gl/QlGVM7 Powered USB Hub - http://goo.gl/nvPzEy Raspberry Pi - http:... How to Install on Raspberry Pi http://raspberrypi4u.blogspot.com/2017/11/raspberry-pi-bitcoin-miner-monero-xmr.html email : [email protected] [email protected]

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